HomeTravelLondon travel chaos continues as Tube strike brings capital to standstill

London travel chaos continues as Tube strike brings capital to standstill


The travel chaos caused by yesterday’s Tube strike continues in London today, as commuters report very few London Underground services are running.

The network-wide 1 March walkout affected all Tube lines, running from one minute past midnight to one minute to midnight, with another 24-hour strike planned for Thursday.

But the industrial action is still having a major impact this morning – according to The Independent’s travel correspondent Simon Calder, “central London is in complete chaos. No Tubes running yet, buses on diversion and general misery.”

Londoners have shared their frustrations on social media.

“Just about to head off to work… Why the flip are most of the lines still suspended after yesterday’s #tubestrike ?! Sack walking it in the rain,” wrote one Twitter user.

Another shared a picture of the London Underground service updates page, which shows most lines as being suspended or part suspended, alongside the caption: “I thought the #tubestrike was yesterday and tomorrow….. What happened today?”

Transport for London (TfL) warned passengers to expect “Severe disruption across all Tube lines in the morning” on the days after the strikes.

Follow below for the latest updates:

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Central, Victoria, Bakerloo and Northern Lines open – with some small print

TfL is currently advising that the Central, Victoria, Bakerloo and Northern Lines are open – but the Bakerloo Line is experiencing minor delays and some Northern Line stations are reportedly still closed.

TfL Rail and the DLR are also operating a good service.

Clapham South and Chalk Farm are two of the stations commuters found closed at the beginning of the day.

The Circle Line is suspended, and the District, Hammersmith & City, Metropolitan, Piccadilly and Jubilee Line all have severe delays.

The London Overground is also running a reduced service.

Lucy Thackray2 March 2022 08:52

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Commuters confused by continuing chaos

Commuters have shared their confusion after finding no Tube services running this morning.

“Tube strike was yesterday, why is nothing back open and running today?” tweeted one Londoner.

Readers have asked why, if Tube workers are no longer striking, services are still impacted today.

The Independent understands that early trains are operated by night shift workers, who carry out duties at depots before preparing the first public services. They normally sign on before midnight – but, as this was still within the RMT strike instruction, many did not report for work.

The morning shift can pick up, but not until halfway through what would normally be the morning rush hour.

Helen Coffey2 March 2022 08:09

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Good morning and welcome to The Independent’s travel liveblog. We’ll be bringing you all the latest updates on the fall-out from yesterday’s Tube strike.

Helen Coffey2 March 2022 08:02

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London calling

Today’s travel podcast was recorded aboard one of the few Underground trains running in London: a shuttle service between High Street Kensington and Wimbledon.

While it is not exactly a journey of Trans-Canadian proportions, it was the best that I could find on a strike day.

I was surprised to find so few people aboard – perhaps 50 at most – and by the closure of Earl’s Court, normally one of the busiest hubs on the Underground network.

Another shuttle is expected to run on the same route on Thursday, the day of the next strike.

Simon Calder1 March 2022 18:15

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Why are early Tube services disrupted tomorrow?

Transport for London (TfL) is warning Tube users: “Disruption will continue tomorrow morning, Wednesday 2 March, with no Tube service until at least 7.30am and a severely disrupted service after this.

“Customers are advised to avoid travelling in the early morning and aim to make journeys from mid-morning.”

Readers have asked why, if Tube workers are no longer striking, services will not be restored from the first trains.

The Independent understands that early trains are operated by night shift workers, who carry out duties at depots before preparing the first public services. They normally sign on before midnight – but, as this is still within the RMT strike instruction, many will not report for work.

The morning shift can pick up, but not until halfway through what would normally be the morning rush hour.

TfL warns: “Further disruption is expected all day on Thursday 3 March, when customers are advised to work from home if they can, and into the morning of Friday 4 March, when customers should avoid early morning journeys.”

A few services, such as a shuttle between Wimbledon and High Street Kensington on the District Line, will continue to operate.

Simon Calder1 March 2022 17:29

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Winning at Wimbledon: a rush-hour train with just 50 people aboard

Some Underground trains are running. I set off to catch one. High Street Kensington station is open, but a series of whiteboards contain handwritten warnings about the journey limitations brought about by the Tube strike.

“There are NO trains to Edgware Road,” one notice explains. “We are only operating a shuttle service to Wimbledon and Ealing Broadway”.

The latter link is an improvement on the morning’s service, offering connections to a string of west London stations including Hammersmith.

On board the 4.02pm departure for Wimbledon, I counted no more than 50 people in the entire length of the train – compared with many hundreds who would normally be aboard.

The uncertainties of travel at a time of industrial action were made clear at West Brompton, when the driver announced that the next station – Fulham Broadway – might be closed by the time we arrived.

As it turned out, the station celebrated by Ian Dury in the song What a Waste was still open for business.

The full journey to Wimbledon was a brisk 20 minutes. I expected to arrive at a station busy with commuters who were using South Western Railway and tram services to evade the Tube closure. In fact, there were just a handful of commuters – suggesting many had heeded TfL’s warning to stay at home.

Going Underground: Simon Calder makes tracks

(Laurence Geller CBE)

Simon Calder1 March 2022 17:15

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Thursday’s Tube strike set to go ahead

The second 24-hour Tube strike, scheduled to begin at 12.01am on Thursday, looks set to go ahead.

RMT’s John Leach confirmed to BBC London that there have been no negotiations today.

The union’s general secretary said: “What there has been today is an absolute display of complete and total solidarity and determination by London Underground staff and members of the RMT who will not take this attack on their pensions, jobs and terms and conditions lying down.

“The Mayor’s announcements [today] have said nothing about addressing the issues in my opinion so we will continue.”

Helen Coffey1 March 2022 16:53

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Tube strikes “lose-lose situation”, says London Chamber of Commerce and Industry

Richard Burge, chief executive of London Chamber of Commerce and Industry, has spoken out about the Tube strikes, calling them “disruptive and frustrating”.

“Tube strikes are a lose-lose situation and have a knock-on effect, discouraging people from coming to London for work or leisure which reduces footfall and in turn means that London businesses suffer,” Burge told the BBC.

“It is shameful that the RMT continue to consider strikes as a legitimate weapon to force a desired resolution.”

Lucy Thackray1 March 2022 15:59

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Heathrow bus bargains

With the Tube network effectively closed, travellers between central London and Heathrow airport are mainly relying on trains and taxis.

The cheapest rail link between the UK’s main aviation hub and London Paddington is £11.60, taking around 35 minutes. Onward travel from Paddington is also tricky, since it is some distance from the heart of London.

Megabus has hourly coaches between Heathrow and London Victoria, which are selling for £9.88 for the 50-minute journey. National Express is selling seats at either £7.50 or £10 for its half-hourly services.

For any destination in south London, the X26 bus from Heathrow costs just £1.65 and serves East and West Croydon station, which have links to a wide range of locations by overground and tram.

(Simon Calder)

Simon Calder1 March 2022 15:14

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Water ways

During the Tube strike some London commuters are avoiding the crowds on buses and overground trains by taking ferries or sightseeing vessels along the River Thames.

Thames Clippers, branded as Uber Boat, has a 23-stop route between Woolwich Royal Arsenal in the east and Putney in the west.

The full distance costs £13.50 one way and can be paid by contactless or Transport for London’s Oyster card.

City Cruises has departures about every 50 minutes on a route running from Westminster, the London Eye and the Tower of London to Greenwich. The one-way online fare is £11.75.

Simon Calder1 March 2022 14:47


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