16 C
New York
HomeHome & GardenRules of Recovery: How to save and improve your garden after the...

Rules of Recovery: How to save and improve your garden after the damage caused by Storm Eunice

Rules of Recovery: How to save and improve your garden after the damage caused by Storm Eunice

  • Nigel Colborn shares how to save gardens after damage caused by Storm Eunice
  • UK-based garden expert says don’t despair as plants can recover rapidly 
  •  Recommends clearing up the debris before assessing any damage 










You’re not alone if the storm wrecked your garden last week. Almost everyone has suffered some degree of damage. 

But don’t despair. Plants can recover rapidly and what looks like disaster might even be a blessing. 

Storm Eunice trashed my climber-laden trellis. But after clearing up the mess, the garden looked much prettier without it. Here are some suggestions for helping your garden to recover.   

Don’t despair: Gardens will recover from storm damage if you clear up carefully

DON’T DESPAIR — ASSESS THE MESS 

Even after serious damage, things usually look worse than they really are. 

Plants have amazing powers of recovery and most outgrow their problems quickly. So begin by checking all your casualties. 

Felled trees are goners, but anything still upright should recover. 

REHABILITATE DAMAGED PLANTS 

With damaged trees, remove broken branches. If necessary, replace supports on young ones and check that roots are still firm.

With herbaceous varieties and shrubs, cut away broken parts of each plant. They will recover during spring. 

CHECK SUPPORTS FOR YOUNG TREES 

Young trees or shrubs may need extra support to hold them steady while torn root systems heal. Pull straight and use firm stakes. 

TIDY UP ALL BROKEN BRANCHES 

Partially severed branches or split trees which are still upright might be dangerous. 

Remove and prune away all damaged shoots and branches, making clean cuts just above sideshoots or dormant buds. 

REMOVE DEBRIS FROM YOUR POND

Check any pond or water feature for paper, plastic and blown leaves or twigs. 

If left in the pond, they can rot and spoil water quality.

 Take care not to disturb over-wintering wildlife when clearing up the pond. 

STEER CLEAR OF SATURATED SOIL 

Wet soil is easily damaged. So take great care not to trample or walk on the soil. 

Allow time for land to drain, then carry out any repairs. 

RESCUE CLIMBERS DAMAGED BY WIND

When my double trellis crashed, several mature climbers were ruined. So I cut all of them to ground level, then removed an overgrown honeysuckle and a summer jasmine. 

I retained a non-invasive pink clematis C. texensis Etoile Rose. That will now climb on the house wall. 

CUT YOUR GRASS ON A DRY DAY 

Excess rain and unseasonal warmth has caused grass to produce early growth. But mow a saturated lawn, and it’ll look awful. 

Wait for a dry, breezy day for that first cut, with mower blades high for the first pass. 

PRIORITISE SEED SOWING 

Spring, the busiest season of the year, is almost here. But planting and sowing dates are not set in stone. 

If you’re a week or two late, it won’t matter. So decide which jobs are the most urgent and finish those first. 

PLAN FOR WORSE AHEAD 

As ocean temperatures rise, our climate becomes more violent. Give your garden an appraisal. 

Should you plant wind-shielding hedges? Are your plants strong enough? How fragile are your containers? 

Small changes could make your garden more resilient.

Stay Connected
16,985FansLike
52,146FollowersFollow
2,458FollowersFollow
spot_img
Must Read
You might also like

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here